While open to reviewing a variety of titles, Farmer tends to be drawn towards recently translated works, novels by international authors, and books produced by small presses.  

The following reviews have recently appeared in the Sunday edition of The Gazette:


It was early in the morning on July 2, 1997, when Christophe Andre, an administrator serving with Doctors Without Borders in Zazran, Russia, just west of the Chechen border, was kidnapped and held for ransom. The opening pages of “Hostage” by artist Guy Delisle, out this month from Drawn and Quarterly Press, set the scene for what will be Andre’s fate over three months: He is alone in a room, handcuffed to a radiator, kept in near to total darkness. Unable to stand and barely able to move, Andre’s story is one largely of the mind — how does a man sustain his will and sense of self when he is chained in place? Another question might easily be — how does an artist turn such a cerebral tale into a gripping visual page turner? Read full review

It was early in the morning on July 2, 1997, when Christophe Andre, an administrator serving with Doctors Without Borders in Zazran, Russia, just west of the Chechen border, was kidnapped and held for ransom.

The opening pages of “Hostage” by artist Guy Delisle, out this month from Drawn and Quarterly Press, set the scene for what will be Andre’s fate over three months: He is alone in a room, handcuffed to a radiator, kept in near to total darkness.

Unable to stand and barely able to move, Andre’s story is one largely of the mind — how does a man sustain his will and sense of self when he is chained in place?

Another question might easily be — how does an artist turn such a cerebral tale into a gripping visual page turner? Read full review


More reviews are available in the archive below


Reading literature from around the world is a great way to immerse yourself in another culture without leaving home. But why should adults have all the fun? Elsewhere Editions is a new nonprofit publishing house committed to making “visionary picture books from around the world” available to audiences in the United States. Two of its first titles set the bar for what to expect from this press: stunning works that will stir the imagination and peak the curiosity of young and old readers alike. Read full review

 

In “Not One Day,” out this month from Deep Vellum Press, Garréta puts her Oulipo credentials on full display, as the short book is an exercise in restriction and indulgence. To write “Not One Day” Garréta subjected herself “to the discipline of confessional writing.” The plan was to write for five hours a day for one month “aiming to recount the memory you have of one woman or another whom you have desired or who has desired you. This will be the narrative: the unwinding of memory in the strict framework of a given moment.” No consulting letters or journals. No drafting. Each woman is given one essay, one chapter. When read together several powerful juxtapositions emerge: the author’s distance and tenderness; passion and repulsion; truth and fiction. It’s all here, and more — in under 100 pages. Read full review


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ABOUT LAURA FARMER

ABOUT LAURA FARMER